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Over the next few days you'll be seeing a lot of stories from local news organizations about the hot temperatures. On Friday News10 asked its followers onFacebook.com/news10what they wanted to know about the coming heat wave. Here are answers to some of their questions.

HOW BAD WILL THE HEAT WAVE BE?

Gerardo Fregoso asks, "How long the heat will last, when is the peak temperature going to hit, and will there be an evening cooling breeze?"

Hi Gerardo. The heat will last until Wednesday, then we cool from 100 plus to about 95 degrees. The peak temp should be on Tuesday when we see a high near 108 degrees. The problem with this heat wave will be the lows in the morning. There will not be much of a cooling breeze at all so we only see lows getting into the 70s and maybe upper 60s. You can find the full forecast for the next few days here. - Rob Carlmark, News10 morning meteorologist

WHERE CAN I GO TO STAY COOL?

Gerardo also asks, "Also, what are fun things to do in the area that take place INDOORS with air conditioning?"

Gerardo, we brought your question to Brandon Darnell with the Sacramento Convention & Visitors Bureau. He said the Crocker Art Museum, California State Railroad Museum and the Sacramento Children's Museum all have air conditioning and are great places to spend the day with family. There is also the French Film Festival at the Crest Theatre running from June 21-30 and California Musical Theatre's performance of "The Wizard of Oz," also running June 21-30 at the Wells Fargo Pavilion. For more information on local events and attractions you can check out www.sacramento365.com or www.visitsacramento.com. - Linda Park, My Neighborhood

HOW DO YOU PROTECT YOUR PETS DURING THE HEAT WAVE?

Kimmy Selberg asked that we "Cover the dangers of leaving animals in hot cars!" Several others have made similar requests for information about keeping pets safe during the heat wave.

Kimmy, we called Dr. Brian Sullivan of Crossroads Animal Hospital in Orangevale. He said pets should be kept in cool shaded areas. Owners also should ensure that their pets have constant access to water and are never left in cars. In addition, Sullivan recommended that owners avoid putting their pets through strenuous activities and limit walks to morning and evening hours when it's cooler outside. Owners of breeds with pushed-in noses such as pugs, bulldogs and Boston terriers, or cats such as Persians should be extra aware of excessive panting or rapid breathing, depression, diarrhea, vomiting or similar warning signs as these breeds are more susceptible to heat-related ailments. - Paul Janes, News10 web producer

HOW DO YOU PROTECT AGAINST DEHYDRATION?

Kevin Woodard wrote to ask for more information about the "Best ways to stay hydrated when outdoors, warning signs that you are becoming dehydrated."

Kevin, you can find several tips for staying cool and hydrated during the heat wave here. Health experts say it's important not to become dehydrated no matter what the weather. Dehydration - when the body is losing more fluid than it takes in - can lead to increased thirst, weakness, dizziness, fainting and heart palpitations.

To prevent dehydration and other serious heat illnesses, the California Emergency Management Agency and the city of Sacramento Office of Public Health Office advise that you:

1. Drink more fluids - especially water - and more than you think you need.

2. Wear lightweight, comfortable clothing. If you're planning to be outdoors, avoid the hottest parts of the day by scheduling activities during cooler hours (generally mornings and evenings). Also be sure to wear a hat and use sunscreen because sunburn affects the body's ability to cool itself.

3. Don't over exert. Stay cool indoors by turning on an air conditioner or going to a shopping centers or public library.

4. Extra precautions should be taken with young children, the elderly and the infirm. There are regulations employers must follow for outdoor workers.

- Claudia Johnson, News10 web producer

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OF HEAT ILLNESS?

Debbie Staps-Talani wants to know more about the "warning signs of heat stroke/exhaustion."

Debbie, the signs of serious heat exhaustion include increased thirst, weakness, dizziness, fainting, heart palpitations, possible heavy sweating, paleness, muscle cramps, nausea and a headache. Signs of heat stroke include high body temperature, absence of sweating and hot red or flushed dry skin, rapid pulse, difficulty breathing, strange behavior, hallucinations, confusion, agitation and disorientation. Heat stroke also can cause victims to seizures or go into a coma.

You can help prevent heat illness by following the tips from the City of Sacramento Office of Public Health Office included in the answer above. - Claudia Johnson, News10 web producer

HOW DO FIREWORKS AND THE HEAT WAVE IMPACT THE RISK OF FIRES?

Nicholas Denty said he wanted to know more about "Fire risks, especially since so many people will be buying fireworks."

Nicholas, we put your question to Cal Fire spokesman Dennis Mathisen. He said the high temperatures, low humidity, already-dry vegetation and potential for windy conditions are the "perfect recipe for a wildfire."

"When you combine those dry conditions, warm conditions, with fireworks, there's high potential for fires to occur, whether those are grass fires or, if you have people using illegal fireworks and it lands on a dry wood shingle roof, you could easily start a fire," Mathisen said.

He said Cal Fire recommends that residents frequently maintain the defensible space around their homes. However, residents should avoid using mechanized equipment like lawnmowers and weedeaters after 10 a.m. to reduce the risk of fires. Outdoors enthusiasts who have camping trips planned for the weekend also should pay close attention to park restrictions on campfires and ensure that they have all the necessary campfire permits.

Mathisen offered these tips when it comes to the use of fireworks:

  • Make sure you check your community's regulations regarding fireworks. Some communities do not permit use of any fireworks, even those approved by the state.
  • Use only state-approved "safe and sane" fireworks.
  • Make sure there is a responsible adult present when fireworks are being used.
  • Only use fireworks in open areas away from vegetation.
  • Keep a bucket of water nearby for use as a receptacle for spent fireworks.

"Other than that, try and enjoy a safe holiday," Mathisen said. - Ian Hill, News10 executive producer for digital and social media

HOW TO SAVE MONEY AND KEEP YOUR HOUSE COOL?

Debbie Staps-Talani wants to know how you can run your A/C and not hurt your pocketbook.

Hi Debbie, the way to save money on your energy bill is all in how you use your air conditioner. Here are a few tips:

  • Don't run the A/C while no one is home
  • Don't run the A/C when it cools off outside, use fans instead
  • Keep blinds and curtains closed to keep sunlight, and heat, out of your home
  • Don't setyour A/Cat 68 or 70 degrees, it will over work your A/C and cost you a lot more money - Set it at a more reasonable temperaturecompared to the inside of your house, notthe outside temperature

Here is a link to a LifeHacker.com story aboutalternatives to running the A/C

- Maneeza Iqbal, News10 web producer

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