LINKEDINCOMMENTMORE

Chef "Laura Kenny" with Real Foods Catering demonstrated how to make seared salmon with teriyaki sauce and salmon cakes with lemon relish. News10/KXTV

Seared salmon with teriyaki sauce and oranges:

Serves 6

¼ cup soy sauce

¼ cup mirin

1 tablespoon sugar

3 oranges, segmented, reserve juice

Salt and pepper to taste

Cornstarch slurry if needed

2 tablespoons grapeseed oil

1½ pounds salmon filet, cut into 6 equal portions

4 ounces pea shoots

In a small saucepan, combine soy sauce, mirin and sugar, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon orange juice and season to taste with salt and pepper. If desired, thicken with cornstarch slurry. Set aside.

In a large sauté pan, heat oil. Season fish with salt and pepper, and sear, presentation-side down. When cooked about ⅓ through, flip filets, cook less than 1 minute, and remove from heat.

To serve, spoon about ¼ of the sauce on a platter, arrange salmon on top, and garnish with pea shoots and orange segments. Serve remaining sauce in a gravy boat.

Salmon Cakes with Meyer

Lemon Relish

Makes 6 to 8 cakes

1½ pounds salmon, cooked and shredded

3 stalks celery, diced

3 scallions, diced

1 tablespoon parsley, chopped

Salt and pepper to taste

1 egg, beaten

¾ cup panko breadcrumbs

2 tablespoons grapeseed oil

In a large bowl, combine salmon, celery, scallions and parsley. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Add egg and breadcrumbs, and stir to combine.

Form into 2-ounce balls, squeezing them so they hold together, then into flat disks.

Heat oil in a large sauté pan, and sear cakes on both sides until golden brown, about 90 seconds. Serve warm with Meyer lemon relish.

Lemon Relish

3 lemons, segmented

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 teaspoons capers, rinsed

Salt and pepper to taste

Combine lemon segments, olive oil and capers in a small bowl, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve with salmon cakes.

*To make segments, cut off the ends of the citrus fruit, and then cut away the rind and the pith. Carefully cut each segment, avoiding the pith in between. It's a little time consuming, but dresses up your dish a little more. If you work over a bowl, you can save the juice to use later.

LINKEDINCOMMENTMORE
Read or Share this story: http://on.news10.net/1imlBPr